The Gathering Storm

First the Good News:
*The market averages are still in an up trend
*The Fed has yet to “remove the punch bowl”
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Figure 1 – Major Averages still in Up Trends (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
Fed Balance Sheet
Figure 2 – Fed Quantitative Easing propels the stock market (Courtesy RealInvestmentAdvice.com)
Now the bad news
Market Bellwethers Flashing Warnings
In this article I wrote about four tickers I follow for signs of early warnings of trouble.  At the moment, all four are flashing warnings.
bellwether 4
Figure 3 – Bellwethers flashing potential warnings (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
Stocks are Extremely Overvalued
Something important to note: valuation indicators are NOT good timing indicators.  The overall market can be over or undervalued for years. However, overvalued valuation readings are extremely reliable at telling us what will come next once the top is in (whenever that may be).  Figure 4 displays the Schiller CAPE model which measures adjusted P/E ratio.schiller cape w datesFigure 4 – Schiller Adjusted PE (Courtesy: Schiller Data Library)
1901: Dow -37% in 32 months
1929: Dow -89% in 3 years
1932: Dow -49% in 13 months
1965: Dow sideways to 40% lower for 17 years
2000: Nasdaq 100 -87%
2007: Dow -55% in 17 months
2017: ??
When will the exact top form?  Don’t know
What will likely follow?  Don’t Ask
The Decennial Pattern
As I wrote about here and as you can see in Figures 5 and 6, the Year 7 into Year 8 period has historically witnesses significant market weakness.  That does not mean that that is what will happen this time around.  But it is reason for caution.
decennial
Figure 5 – Stock Market Decennial Pattern (Courtesy: OptionStrategist.com)
Year 7 2
Figure 6 – Trouble in Late Year “7”  (Courtesy: OptionStrategist.com)
Figure 7 from Tom McLellan illustrates this phenomenon even more clearly.
Year 7 3
Figure 7 – Trouble in Late Year “7”  (Courtesy: www.mclellanoscillator.com)
September
What a crummy time for September to roll around.  Figure 8 displays the fact that the Dow has lost -80% during the month of September since 1897.sep
Figure 8 – Dow has lost -80% during September since 1897
Figure 9 displays the fact that since 1955 most of the “September Nasty” has occurred in that last 10 trading days of the month (after the close on 9/15 this year)
sep x
Figure 9 – Dow in September; 1st 3 days (blue); Last 10 days (green); in between (red); 1955-2016
Investor Complacency
Despite the fact that:
*We have experienced one of the longest bull markets in history
*Stock prices are extremely overvalued on an objective historical basis
*A number of warning signs are flashing
The investment world seems relatively untroubled (in the interest of full disclosure I have done only limited selling so far myself – more on this in a moment).
Figure 10 displays the AAII investor cash allocation reading from earlier this year.   Low cash levels tend to signal complacency (and impending market trouble) while high cash levels tend to occur near market bottoms.
AAII Cash
Figure 10 – AAII Investor Cash % is low (Courtesy: American Association of Individual Investors)
Figure 11 displays the amount of assets in the Rydex suite of “bearish” funds from earlier this year.  As you can see, investors were not too concerned about the prospects for a bear market – a potential contrarian signal.
rydex bear assets
Figure 11 – Rydex Bearish Funds Assets low (Courtesy: The Lyons Share)
Figure 12 shows the level of margin debt versus stock prices.  Historically when margin debt peaks and begins to decline the stock market suffers significantly.  There is no way to predict  when margin debt will top out and roll over but it did recently reach a new all-time high.  Could it go higher? Absolutely.  But if it rolls over – then look out below.
margin debt x
Figure 12 – If Margin Debt peaks trouble may follow (Courtesy: dshort.com)
Figure 13 displays the stock market versus the number of “Hindenburg Omens” (a measure of “churning” in the stock market) that have occurred in the most recent 6-month period.  Another warning sign is flashing.
Hindenburg Omen 6
Figure 13 – Hindenburg Omen flashing a warning (Courtesy: SentimentTrader.com)
Summary
Does any of the above guarantee that a significant stock market decline is imminent?  The correct answer is “No.”  The major market indexes all remain above their long-term moving averages. This can be considered the very definition of a bull market.
I personally have seen lots of warning signs flash along the way over the years.  And I have found that it is important to pay attention to these and to “prepare for the worst” – i.e., to plan an exit/hedging strategy “just in case.”  But trying to pick the exact top is an excellent way to end up looking stupid.  Trust me on this one.
So here is my summary:
*I do not possess the ability to “call the top” nor to “predict what will happen next” in the stock market
*I do possess a reasonably good ability to identify the trend “right now”
*I also possess the ability to recognize gathering storms clouds (and, yes, they are forming) and the ability to formulate an “emergency plan” as well as the wherewithal to follow the plan “should this be an actual (market) emergency.”
The current level of market valuation – and the history of the stock market following previous similar such readings – suggests that the next bear market will surprise many investors by its severity.
The clouds are gathering.  Please plan accordingly.
Jay Kaeppel Chief Market Analyst at JayOnTheMarkets.com and AIQ TradingExpert Pro client. 
Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.

One More Cry of ‘Wolf’

If I were the type to make bold proclamations I would probably consider “taking my shot” right here and shout “This is the Top” and/or “The Market May Crash.”  Unfortunately, on those occasions (well) in the past when I would make bold public predictions of what was about to happen in the financial markets I would almost invariably end up looking pretty stupid. So even if I did make a “bold proclamation” it wouldn’t necessarily mean that anyone should pay any attention.
Besides all that the last thing I want is for “the party to end”.  Even if you do think the market is about to tank it’s a pretty crummy thing to have to root for.  Even if you did manage to “call the top”, the ripple effect of the ramifications associated with a serious stock market decline can have pretty negative effect on just about everyone’s life.
So let’s put it this way: I am concerned – and prepared to act defensively if necessary – but still have money in the market and am still hoping for the best.
Reasons for Caution (Indexes)
Figure 1 displays four major indexes. The Dow keeps hitting new highs day after day while the others – at the moment – are failing to confirm.  That doesn’t mean that they won’t in the days ahead.  But the longer this trend persists the more negative the potential implications.
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Figure 1 – Dow at new highs, small-caps, Nasdaq and S&P 500 not quite (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
Reasons for Caution (Bellwethers)
Figure 2 displays 4 “bellwethers” that I follow which may give some early warning signs.
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Figure 2 – Market Bellwethers possibly flashing some warning signs (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
*SMH soared to a high in early June and has been floundering a bit since.
*Dow Transports tried to break out to the upside in July but failed miserably.
*XIV is comfortably in new high territory.
*BID tried to break out in July and then collapsed.  It is presently about 12% off of its high.
In a nutshell – 3 of the 4 are presently flashing warning signs.
Reasons for Caution (Market Churn)
In this article I wrote about an indicator that I follow that can be useful in identify market “churn” – which can often be a precursor to market declines.  Spikes above 100 by the blue line often signify impending market trouble
It should be noted that the indicators signals are often early and occasionally flat out wrong.  Still, a churning market with the Dow making new highs has often served as a “classic” warning sign.
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Figure 3 – JK HiLo Index (blue) versus Nasdaq Compsite / 20 (red); 12/31/2006-present
Summary
Again, and for the record, I do not possess the ability to “predict” the markets.  But I have seen a few “warning signs” flash bright red at times in the past.  As a general rule, it is best to at least pay attention – and maybe make a few “contingency plans” – you know,  just in case.
Here’s hoping my gut is wrong – again.
Jay Kaeppel Chief Market Analyst at JayOnTheMarkets.com and AIQ TradingExpert Pro (http://www.aiqsystems.com) client. 
Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.

Detecting Swings

The AIQ code based on Domenico D’Errico’s article in the May 2017 issue of Stocks & Commodities issue, “Detecting Swings,” is provided here.

I tested the author’s four systems using the NASDAQ 100 list of stocks on weekly bars, as did the author, from 3/16/2005 through 3/14/2017. Figure 7 shows the comparative metrics of the four systems using the four-week exit. The results were quite different than the author’s, probably due to a different test portfolio and also a 10-year test period rather than the author’s 20-year period. In addition, my test results show longs only, whereas the author’s results are the average of both the longs and shorts.

Sample Chart

FIGURE 7: AIQ. As coded in EDS, this shows the metrics for the author’s four systems run on NASDAQ 100 stocks (weekly bar data) over the period 3/16/2005 to 3/14/2007.

The Bollinger Band (Buy2) system showed the worst results, whereas the author’s results showed the Bollinger Band system as the best. The pivot system (Buy1) showed the best results, whereas the author’s results showed the pivot system as the worst. I am not showing here the comparative test results for the Sell1 thru Sell4 rules, as all showed an average loss over this test period.

!DECTECTING SWINGS
!Author: Domenico D'Errico, TASC May 2017
!Coded by: Richard Denning, 3/15/17
!www.TradersEdgeSystems.com

!Set to WEEKLY in properties

Low is  [low].
Low1  is valresult(Low,1).
Low2  is valresult(Low,2). 
High is [high].
High1  is valresult(High,1).
High2  is valresult(High,2). 
PivotLow if Low1 < Low2  and Low1 < Low.
PivotHigh if High1 > High2  and High1 > High.

Buy1 if  PivotLow.  
Sell1 if  PivotHigh.    

!Set parameter for bollinger bands to 12 with 2 sigma (weekly) in charts:
Buy2 if [close] > [Lower BB] and valrule([close] <= [Lower BB],1).
Sell2 if [close] < [Upper BB] and valrule([close] >= [Upper BB],1).

!Set parameter for Wilder RSI to 5 (weekly) in charts:
Buy3 if [RSI Wilder] > 40 and valrule([RSI Wilder] <= 40,1).
Sell3 if [RSI Wilder] < 60 and valrule([RSI Wilder] >= 60,1).

Buy4 if [RSI Wilder] < 40  And Low > Low1.
Sell4 if [RSI Wilder] > 60  And High < High1.    

Exit if {position days} >= 4.

The code and EDS file can be downloaded from http://aiqsystems.com/detectingswings.EDS

—Richard Denning

info@TradersEdgeSystems.com

for AIQ Systems

Respect the Trend, But Beware

It is hard to look at Figure 1 and argue that the trend of the stock market is anything but bullish.  Major averages making new all-time highs is essentially the very definition of a bull market.  And indeed the market may continue to push higher indefinitely.
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Figure 1 – Four Major Averages all at or near all-time highs (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
Trying to “pick a top” usually ends with an embarrassed prognosticator.  Particularly when the major market averages are posting new highs.  Still, there comes a time when it can pay to pay close attention for signs of “Trouble in Paradise”.  That time may be now.
Four Bellwethers
In this article I wrote about 4 “bellwethers” that I follow for potential “early warning signals”.  So far no “run for cover” signals have appeared.  Two of the four have confirmed the new highs in the market averages and the other two have not.  If and when 3 or 4 of them fail to confirm that may signal trouble ahead.
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Figure 2 – XIV and BID confirm news highs; SMH and TRAN so far have not (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
XIV and BID have confirmed new highs in the major averages (although the parabolic nature of XIV’s run is somewhat troubling to me) while SMH and the Dow Transports have not.
Post-Election/Year “7” Bermuda Triangle
have written about this a few times but it bears repeating here.  Post-Election Years and Years ending in “7” (1907, 1917, etc.) have typically witnessed “trouble” in the second half of the year.  Figures 3 and 4 are posted courtesy of a Twitter post from Larry McMillan of the Option Strategist.
Figure 3 highlights the fact that the 2nd half of “Years 7” have often witnessed “trouble.”
Figure 4 show that each “7” year posted a high during the 2nd half of the year (or in June) and then suffered a decline.  This does not guarantee a repeat this year but it is a warning sign.
Year 7 1
Figure 3 – Decade Pattern for the Dow Jones Industrials Average (Courtesy: Options Strategist)
Year 7 2
Figure 4 – Years “7” (Courtesy: Options Strategist)
Also, during years that are both “post-election” years AND “Years ending in 7”, the August through October results have been brutal- as depicted in Figure 5 – with an average 3-month decline of -15%.2
Figure 5 – August/September/October of Post-Election Years that also End in “7”
Nothing in Figures 3 through 5 “guarantee” an imminent market decline.  They do however, constitute the reason the word “Beware” appears in the headline.
Valuation
Last week I witnessed a presentation where a quite knowledgeable gentleman posted a chart of the Schiller PE Ratio.  He made note of the fact that the Schiller PE Ratio has only been higher twice in modern history – 1929 and 2000.  The 1929 peak was followed by an 89% decline by the Dow and the 2000 peak was followed by an 83% decline by the Nasdaq.  So are we doomed to experience a devastating decline?  Not necessarily.  At least not necessarily anytime soon.  The stock market became “overvalued” in 1995 and then continued to  rally sharply higher for another 4+ years.  Likewise, the market as theoretically been “overvalued” since 2013 – and so far so good.
Figure 6 shows the price action of the Dow Jones Industrials Average since 1901 in blue and the movements of the Schiller PE Ratio in green.
The peaks in the Schiller PE ratio in:
1901
1929
1937
1965
1995-2000
2003-2008
Were all followed by “something bad”.
While the exact timing is unknowable, as you can see in Figure 6, history does suggest that ultimately a “happy ending” is unlikely.
PE Ratio chart
Figure 6 – A History Lesson in High Shiller PE Ratio Readings: Dow Jones Industrials Average (blue line) and Schiller PE Ratio (green line); 1901-present
Summary
I absolutely, positively DO NOT possess the ability to “predict” what is going to happen in the financial markets.  I have gotten pretty good however, at identifying when risk is unusually high or low.
Current Status: Risk High
Because I don’t offer investment advice on this blog – and because my track record of “market calls” is so bad, no one should interpret anything in this article as a call to “Sell Everything”, especially since I  haven’t even done that myself  – us “trend-followers” usually take awhile to give up the ghost.  In reality, I hope that stocks continue to rally and that this article ends up making me looking stupid, er, I mean “overly cautious”.
But the real point is simply that having plans, mechanisms, etc. to reduce risk in your portfolio makes sense.
Jay Kaeppel Chief Market Analyst at JayOnTheMarkets.com and TradingExpert Pro client. 
Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.

A Focus on the Trends in Stocks, Bonds and Gold

In the end it is not so much about “predicting” what will happen next in the financial markets, but rather recognizing – and being prepared for – the potential risks, that makes the most difference in the long run.  So let’s start by looking at current trends.
Stocks
Let’s start with a most simple trend-following model that works like this:
-A sell signal occurs when the S&P 500 Index (SPX) registers two consecutive monthly closes below its 21-month moving average
-After a sell signal, a buy signal occurs when SPX register a single monthly close above its 10-month moving average.
Figure 1 displays recent activity.
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Figure 1 – SPX Trend-Following signals (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
The good news is that this model does a good job of being out of stocks during long bear markets (1973-74, 2000-2002, 2008-2009).  The bad news is that – like any trend-following model – it gets “whipsawed” from time to time.  In fact the two most recent signals resulted in missing out on the October 2015 and March 2016 rallies.
But note the use of the phrase “simple trend-following model” and the lack of phrases such as “precision market timing” and “you can’t lose trading the stock market”, etc.
For now the trend is up.  A few things to keep an eye on appear in Figures 2 and 3.  Figure 2 displays four major averages.  Keep an eye to see if these averages break out to the upside (see here) or if they move sideways to lower.
2Figure 2 – Four Major Market Averages (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
In addition, I suggest following the 4 tickers in Figure 3 for potential “early warnings” – i.e., if the major averages hit new highs that are not confirmed by the majority of the tickers in Figure 3.3
Figure 3 – Four potential “Early Warning” tickers  (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
Bonds
My main “simple bond trend-following model” remains bearish.  As you can see in Figure 4, a buy signal for bonds occurs when the 5-week moving average for ticker EWJ (Japanese stocks) drops below its 30-week moving average and vice versa.
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Figure 4 – Ticker EWJ 5-week and 30-week moving average versus ticker TLT (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
A 2nd model using metals to trade bonds has been bullish of late but is close to dropping back into bearish territory.  Figure 5 displays the P/L from holding a long position of 1 t-bond futures contract ONLY when both the EWJ AND Metals models are bearish (red line) versus when EITHER model is bullish (blue line)
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Figure 5 – T-bond futures $ gain/loss when EWJ OR Metals Models are Bullish (blue line) versus when EWJ AND Metals Models are both Bearish (red line); August 1990-present
Gold
My most basic gold trend-following model is still bearish.  This model uses my “Anti-Gold Index” (comprised of tickers GLL, SPX, UUP and YCS).  It is bullish for gold when a Front-Weighted Moving Average (detailed here) is below the 55-week exponential moving average and vice versa.
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Figure 6 – Jay’s “Anti-Gold Index” versus ticker GLD (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
Summary
So at the moment the stock model is bullish and the bond and gold models are bearish.  Are these trends certain to persist ad infinitum into the future?  Definitely not.  Will the models detailed here provide timely signals regarding when to get in or out the next time around?  Sorry, but it doesn’t always work that way with trend-following.
But as for me I prefer “riding the trend” to “predicting the future.”
Some painful lessons just stick with you I guess.
Jay Kaeppel  Chief Market Analyst at JayOnTheMarkets.com and AIQ TradingExpert Pro (http://www.aiqsystems.com) client. 
Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.

Summer Fun with Biotech and Real Estate

Studies suggest that buying an upside breakout can be a good strategy.  It sure can be scary though.  There is always that underlying fear of looking like “the last fool in” if the security in question experiences only a false breakout and then reverses back to the downside (and I hate it when that happens).  Still, for a stock to go from $50 to $100 it first has to go to $50.01, then $50.02, etc.
Buying into an impending breakout can be an even dicier proposition since this involves buying into what is essentially a “topping formation.”  I recently wrote about consolidation patterns in biotech and real estate.  These sectors appear to be getting closer to a resolution.  Consider tickers XBI (biotech ETF) and IYR (real estate ETF) as shown in Figure 1.
1Figure 1 – Biotech and Real Estate (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
XBI appears to be breaking out to the upside – at least for now.  IYR is close to breaking out – however, one could look at it in an exactly opposite manner and claim that it is “running into resistance near the old highs and therefore may be forming a top.”
Ah, the eye of the beholder.
A Seasonal Play in Biotech and Real Estate
It is pretty widely known at this point that the summer months tend not to be very favorable for the stock market overall (although July of this year might be an exception to the rule).  But biotech and real estate often provide a summer trading opportunity.
The seasonally favorable period extends from:
*The close on June trading day #17 (6/23/2017 this year)
*Through the close on July trading day #21 (7/31/2017 this year)
Figure 2 displays the growth of $1,000 split evenly between ticker FBIOX (Fidelity Select Biotech) and ticker FRESX (Fidleity Select Real Estate) every since 1989 during this period.
2Figure 2 – Growth of $1,000 split between FBIOX and FRESX during seasonally favorable summer period (1989-2016)
Figure 3 displays a summary of the results since 1989.
Measure Result
# Years UP 22 (79%)
# Years DOWN 6 (21%)
Average All Years +3.3%
Average UP Year +5.0%
Average DOWN Year (-2.9%)
Best UP Year +14.9% (2009)
Worst DOWN Year (-4.3%) (2004)
Figure 3 – Summary Results
One thing to  note is the lack of downside volatility despite the fact that both biotech and real estate can be quite volatile (worst down period was -4.3% in 2004).
Year-by-Year Results Appear in Figure 4.  For comparisons sake the annual performance for the Dow Jones Industrials Average (DJIA) during the same period is included.
  Year        FBIOX/FRESX    DJIA    Diff
1989 4.8 5.1 (0.3)
1990 2.8 2.1 0.7
1991 5.8 3.6 2.2
1992 7.0 3.2 3.7
1993 0.8 2.1 (1.3)
1994 (0.6) 1.8 (2.4)
1995 3.5 2.7 0.8
1996 (4.1) (4.1) 0.1
1997 2.9 6.4 (3.5)
1998 1.8 2.2 (0.5)
1999 4.4 (0.1) 4.5
2000 0.3 1.1 (0.8)
2001 (3.6) 0.1 (3.8)
2002 (1.5) (4.9) 3.4
2003 8.0 1.0 7.0
2004 (4.3) (2.9) (1.4)
2005 9.6 2.1 7.5
2006 4.0 1.8 2.2
2007 (3.2) (1.0) (2.1)
2008 6.7 (1.9) 8.6
2009 14.9 10.0 4.9
2010 2.0 1.6 0.4
2011 3.0 0.8 2.2
2012 5.7 4.0 1.7
2013 12.6 5.2 7.5
2014 1.1 0.4 0.7
2015 0.6 (2.2) 2.8
2016 8.6 2.3 6.2
Figure 4 – Annual Results for FBBIOX/FRESX during seasonally favorable  summer period versus Dow Jones Industrials Average
For the record,during the seasonally favorable summer period:
*The FBIOX/FRESX combo has outperformed the Dow in 19 out of 28 years.
*$1,000 invested in FBIOX/FRESX grew to $2,440
*$1,000 invested in the Dow Industrials grew to $1,505
Summary
So is biotech and real estate the place to be in the month ahead?  Well, that’s “the thing” about seasonal trends – there’s no way to know for sure what it’s going to be “this time around.”
On a cautionary note, it should be pointed out that the FBIOX/FRESX combo has registered a gain during the seasonal summer period – and outperformed the Dow – in each of the last 9 nine years.
So is it “Away We Go” or this the year that “Murphy’s Law” exacts its revenge?  As always, time will tell.
Jay Kaeppel  Chief Market Analyst at JayOnTheMarkets.com and AIQ TradingExpert Pro (http://www.aiqeducation.com) client. 
Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.

One Good Reason NOT to Pick a Bottom in DIS

A better title for this article might be “How to Avoid Losing 98% in Disney.”
The recent dip in the price of Disney stock may ultimately prove to be a buying opportunity.  But for reasons detailed below I am going to let this one pass.
If you have read my stuff in the past you know that I look a lot at seasonal trends.  This is especially true for sectors and commodities – which in some cases can be tied to recurring fundamental factors.  I have occasionally looked at individual stocks (here and here and here), but tend to think that an individual company’s fundamentals can change so drastically over time that a persistent seasonal trend is less likely.
It appears that there are exceptions to every rule.
In Figure 1 below we see that after a strong run up from its 2009 low, Disney finally topped out in August of 2015. Since that time it’s been a string of large moves up and down – with the latest being down. This might prompt one to consider the latest dip as a buying opportunity.  And in fact, maybe it is. But I won’t be making that play myself based simply on a seasonal trend in DIS stock that was highlighted by Brooke Thackray in his book Thackray’s 2017 Investor’s Guide.
0Figure 1 – Is latest dip in DIS a buying opportunity?  Maybe, but history suggests we look elsewhere….(Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
When NOT to Own Disney Stock
In his book, Thackray highlights the period from June 5th through the end of September as an “unfavorable” period for DIS stock.  He also listed a specific “favorable” period that I’ll not mention here.  For purposes of this article I made the following changes:
*The “unfavorable” period begins at the close on the 5th trading day of June and ends at the close on the last trading day of September.
*The rest of the year – i.e., end of September until the close on the 5th trading day of June – is considered the “favorable” period.
Also, the test uses price data only.  No dividends are included nor is any interest assumed to be earned while out of DIS stock.
The results are fairly striking.  From the end of 1971 through the end of 2016:
*$1,000 invested in DIS on a buy-and-hold basis grew +8,042% to $81,422 (average annual +/- = +15.8%)
*$1,000 invested in DIS only during the “favorable” period grew +430,874% to $4,309,735 (average annual +/- = +25.0%)
*$1,000 invested in DIS only during the “unfavorable” period declined -98% to $18.89 (average annual +/- = (-6.9%))
It’s sort of hard to ignore the difference between +430,784% and -98%.
Figure 1 displays the cumulative performance during the unfavorable period from 1971 through 2016.
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Figure 1 – Growth of $1,000 invested in DIS only from close of June Trading Day #5 through the end of September (1971-2016)
Figure 2 displays the growth of $1,000 during the favorable period (blue line) versus a buy-and-hold approach (red line).
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Figure 2 – Growth of $1,000 invested in DIS only from the end of September through June Trading Day #5 (blue) versus Buy-and-Hold (red); 1971-2016
*The favorable period showed a net gain in 39 out of 45 years (87%)
*The unfavorable period showed a net gain in only 13 out of 45 years (29%)
*Buy-and-hold showed a net gain in 28 out of 45 years (62%)
Figure 3 displays year-by-year results.
Year Favorable Unfavorable Buy/Hold
1972 78.1 (3.5) 71.9
1973 (53.5) (12.0) (59.1)
1974 4.4 (56.4) (54.4)
1975 175.6 (12.4) 141.5
1976 5.2 (6.9) (2.0)
1977 (28.2) 19.1 (14.4)
1978 4.6 (3.3) 1.2
1979 1.2 10.5 11.9
1980 20.8 (5.8) 13.8
1981 42.8 (28.7) 1.9
1982 16.0 4.4 21.1
1983 (5.7) (11.6) (16.7)
1984 25.6 (9.6) 13.6
1985 94.4 (3.3) 88.0
1986 98.3 (23.0) 52.8
1987 14.6 20.1 37.6
1988 4.2 6.5 10.9
1989 32.7 28.3 70.3
1990 28.4 (29.4) (9.3)
1991 14.4 (1.5) 12.8
1992 51.3 (0.7) 50.2
1993 16.0 (14.5) (0.8)
1994 23.2 (12.4) 7.9
1995 27.7 0.3 28.0
1996 18.4 0.0 18.4
1997 43.3 (0.9) 41.9
1998 36.9 (33.6) (9.1)
1999 15.8 (15.8) (2.5)
2000 4.0 (4.8) (1.1)
2001 23.6 (42.1) (28.4)
2002 12.6 (30.1) (21.3)
2003 50.9 (5.2) 43.0
2004 28.9 (7.6) 19.2
2005 (2.5) (11.6) (13.8)
2006 41.8 0.8 43.0
2007 (6.2) 0.4 (5.8)
2008 (24.4) (7.0) (29.7)
2009 29.1 10.1 42.1
2010 16.1 0.2 16.3
2011 30.4 (23.4) (0.0)
2012 15.9 14.6 32.8
2013 54.3 (0.6) 53.4
2014 17.2 5.2 23.3
2015 20.4 (7.3) 11.6
2016 5.0 (5.6) (0.8)
2017 ? ? ?
# Years UP 39 13 28
# Years DOWN 6 32 17
Average % +/- 25.0 (6.9) 15.8
Figure 3 – Year-by-Year Results
Summary
Brooke Thackray found an extremely interesting and robust “unfavorable” seasonal trend in DIS stock.  Of course none of the data above guarantees that DIS stock is doomed to languish and/or decline in the months ahead.  But I for one do not intend to “buck the odds” and play the long side of DIS for a while.
Jay Kaeppel  Chief Market Analyst at JayOnTheMarkets.com and AIQ TradingExpert Pro http://www.aiqsystems.com) client. 
Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.

This is What a Lack of Fear Looks Like (I Think)

I keep hearing that investors are “skittish” and “concerned” about the markets and the economy and so forth.  But the recent action in a relatively obscure ETF jumped out at me and seems to suggest that this is not necessarily the case – at least not among those who are active in the markets.  From what I can tell these people don’t have a care in the world.  See what you think.
What is Ticker SVXY?
A few key concepts:
*Implied volatility (IV) essentially measures the level of time premium built into the price of a given option or series of options on a given security.  In anxious times implied volatility will rise – sometimes sharply – as an increase in demand by speculators rushing to buy options to protect / hedge / speculate / etc in a given security, causes time premium to inflate.  When traders are less worried or more complacent then implied volatility will typically fall as decreased option buying pressure results in lower time premiums.
In sum, high and/or sharply rising IV typically signals fear, low and or declining IV typically signals a lack thereof.
*The VIX Index (see Figure 1) measures the implied volatility of options for the S&P 500 Index traded at the CBOE.  Typically when the stock market declines – especially when it declines sharply – the VIX index tends to “spike” as fearful traders rush in and bid up S&P 500 Index option prices
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Figure 1 – VIX Index (trading inversely to S&P 500 Index) (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
*In essence, the VIX Index is “inversely correlated” to the stock market.
*Ticker SVXY is an ETF that is designed to track the “inverse” of the VIX Index.  In other words, when VIX rises, SVXY falls and vice versa.  This also means the following:
*Ticker SVXY is highly correlated to the SP 500 Index.  In other words, as the stock market moves higher SVXY typically also moves higher and vice versa.
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Figure 2 – SVXY (movements are correlated to the S&P 500 index)(Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
In sum, a declining trend in the price of SVXY shares typically signals fear, while a rising trend in the price of SXVY typically signals a lack thereof.
Now to My Concern
Hopefully some of that made sense.  In a nutshell, the key takeaways are that when fear is low:
*SVXY rises
*Implied volatility declines
But what if both go to extremes?  Is that a bad thing?  The reason I ask appears in Figure 3. 3
Figure 3 – Ticker SVXY at an all-time high with implied volatility for options on ticker SVXY plunging (both pointing to a lack of fear)
As far as I can tell, this is what a lack of fear looks like:
*Ticker SVXY is rising dramatically
*Implied volatility (SVXY options) is plunging
In the last 4 years there has never been a bigger disparity between these two measures of “fear” – and they are both pointing to “no fear.”
Summary
So the obvious question now is – does any of this matter?  I mean this is more of a “perspective” indicator (“where we are now”) than a “timing’  indicator (“where we are headed next”).  I cannot presently point out a way to use this to generate specific buy and sell signals.
In addition, as a trend-follower I am not the type to make any “Aha, the End is Near” type pronouncements.  As long as the market wants to keep running higher I am happy to “go along for the ride.”
But the less I see my fellow riders being concerned about the market, the more concerned I become.
In the long run that instinct has served me well.
(Here’s hoping that my instinct is wrong this time)
Jay Kaeppel
Chief Market Analyst at JayOnTheMarkets.com and AIQ TradingExpert Pro (http://www.aiqsystems.com) client. http://jayonthemarkets.com/
Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.

Detecting Swings

The AIQ code based on Domenico D’Errico’s article in the May 2017 issue of Stoks Commodities, “Detecting Swings,” is provided below.

I tested the author’s four systems using the NASDAQ 100 list of stocks on weekly bars, as did the author, from 3/16/2005 through 3/14/2017. Figure 7 shows the comparative metrics of the four systems using the four-week exit. The results were quite different than the author’s, probably due to a different test portfolio and also a 10-year test period rather than the author’s 20-year period. In addition, my test results show longs only, whereas the author’s results are the average of both the longs and shorts.

Sample Chart
 
FIGURE 7: AIQ. As coded in EDS, this shows the metrics for the author’s four systems run on NASDAQ 100 stocks (weekly bar data) over the period 3/16/2005 to 3/14/2007.

The Bollinger Band (Buy2) system showed the worst results, whereas the author’s results showed the Bollinger Band system as the best. The pivot system (Buy1) showed the best results, whereas the author’s results showed the pivot system as the worst. I am not showing here the comparative test results for the Sell1 thru Sell4 rules, as all showed an average loss over this test period.

!DECTECTING SWINGS
!Author: Domenico D'Errico, TASC May 2017
!Coded by: Richard Denning, 3/15/17
!www.TradersEdgeSystems.com

!Set to WEEKLY in properties

Low is  [low].
Low1  is valresult(Low,1).
Low2  is valresult(Low,2). 
High is [high].
High1  is valresult(High,1).
High2  is valresult(High,2). 
PivotLow if Low1 < Low2  and Low1 < Low.
PivotHigh if High1 > High2  and High1 > High.

Buy1 if  PivotLow.  
Sell1 if  PivotHigh.    

!Set parameter for bollinger bands to 12 with 2 sigma (weekly) in charts:
Buy2 if [close] > [Lower BB] and valrule([close] <= [Lower BB],1).
Sell2 if [close] < [Upper BB] and valrule([close] >= [Upper BB],1).

!Set parameter for Wilder RSI to 5 (weekly) in charts:
Buy3 if [RSI Wilder] > 40 and valrule([RSI Wilder] <= 40,1).
Sell3 if [RSI Wilder] < 60 and valrule([RSI Wilder] >= 60,1).

Buy4 if [RSI Wilder] < 40  And Low > Low1.
Sell4 if [RSI Wilder] > 60  And High < High1.    

Exit if {position days} >= 4.
—Richard Denning
info@TradersEdgeSystems.com
for AIQ Systems
Editor note: The code and EDS file can be downloaded from http://aiqsystems.com/Detecting_Swings_TASC_May_2017.EDS

It’s Soon or Never for Bonds

There is great trepidation in the bond market these days. Most investors seem to have the “interest rates are sure to rise” mantra playing on auto loop in their head.  And this is not entirely unwarranted.  Given the historical tendency for bond yields to move in long, slow trends (20 years or more essentially in one direction is not uncommon), I for one am pretty confident in believing that interest rates will be higher 20 years from now than they are now.
But that is not the fear that is playing in people’s heads. The fear in people’s heads is that rates are rising soon (like immediately) and in a big way.  This however, may or may not prove to be the case.
Figure 1 displays a history of 10-year treasury yields through about 2012 (FYI 10-yr. yields are roughly in changed since that time).  Note the long-term nature of interest rate trends and that while there are “spikes” here and there, most major moves play out over time and not in “here today, sharply higher tomorrow” fashion.
1Figure 1 –
10-year treasury bond yields; 1900-2012(Courtesy: ObservationsandNotes.blogspot.com)
Also, you can see in Figure 2 – one can make a compelling argument that bond yields are not “officially rising”, at least not yet.
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Figure 2 – Yields still “officially” in a downtrend
Bonds are Due to Bounce – But Will They?
One way to identify important turning points in any market is when a market doesn’t do something that it would normally be expected to do.  For example, here is a simple thought process:
1) The bond market is oversold
2) In the past 30 years, pretty much anytime it would get oversold a rally ensued
3) Therefore, bonds should rally soon
But will they – that is the question.  And in my opinion, the answer is important.
*If bonds rally soon (i.e., over the course of say the next several months) then “the status may still be quo”.
*If bonds do not rally soon, then it may be a sign that “things are changing”
Which Way Bonds?
Figures 3 and 4 below display ticker TLT (an ETF that tracks the long-term treasury bond) with an indicator I call UpDays20.  In this case we are looking at weekly bars and not daily bars, but the concept is the same.
UpDays20 is calculated by simply adding up all of the weeks that have showed a weekly gain over the past 20 weeks and then subtracting 10 (the AIQ TradingExpert Expert Design Studio code appears at the end of this article, after the disclaimer).
If 10 of the past 20 weeks have showed a weekly gain then the upDays20 indicator will read 0 (i.e., a total of 10 weeks were up minus 10 = 0).  If only 6 weeks showed a gain in the past 20 weeks then the UpDays20 indicator will read -4, etc.
What to look for: Typically (at least in the declining rate environment of recent decades) when UpDays20 rises by a value of 2 from a low of -2 or less, a decent rally in bonds has ensued.
For example, if UpDays20 falls to -4 then a rise to -2 or higher triggers a buy signal.  If it falls only as low as -3 then a rise to -1 or higher is required.  If it falls only as low as -2 then a rise to 0 or higher is required.
Figures 3 and 4 highlight signals since roughly 2004.
3
Figure 3 – Ticker TLT with UpDays20 weekly buy signals (2004-2010); (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
4a
Figure 4 – Ticker TLT with UpDays20 weekly buy signals (2010-2017); (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
As you can see in Figures 3 and 4, most of the signals highlighted were followed by at least a decent short-term rally.
In 2017, buy signals from the UpDays20 indicator occurred on 1/13 and 4/14.  TLT is up +0.3% since the 1/13 signal and down -1.4% since the 4/14 signal.
Summary
Either:
1) This is an excellent time to buy the long-term bond (looking for at least a short to intermediate term rally) as a rally is overdue
OR
2) The “times they may be a changing” for bonds
So keep an eye on TLT over the next several months.
Jay Kaeppel
Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.
AIQ Expert Design Studio Code for UpDays20
Up1 if [close] > val([close],1).
Up2 if val([close],1) > val([close],2).
Up3 if val([close],2) > val([close],3).
Up4 if val([close],3) > val([close],4).
Up5 if val([close],4) > val([close],5).
Up6 if val([close],5) > val([close],6).
Up7 if val([close],6) > val([close],7).
Up8 if val([close],7) > val([close],8).
Up9 if val([close],8) > val([close],9).
Up10 if val([close],9) > val([close],10).
Up11 if val([close],10) > val([close],11).
Up12 if val([close],11) > val([close],12).
Up13 if val([close],12) > val([close],13).
Up14 if val([close],13) > val([close],14).
Up15 if val([close],14) > val([close],15).
Up16 if val([close],15) > val([close],16).
Up17 if val([close],16) > val([close],17).
Up18 if val([close],17) > val([close],18).
Up19 if val([close],18) > val([close],19).
Up20 if val([close],19) > val([close],20).
UpCount is (Up1+ Up2+Up3+Up4+Up5+Up6+Up7+Up8+Up9+Up10+Up11+Up12+Up13+Up14+Up15+Up16+Up17+Up18+Up19+Up20)-10.
You can also download the EDS file for this at this link http://aiqsystems.com/Its_Soon_or_Never_for_Bonds.EDS