Category Archives: EDS

Backtesting A Mean-Reversion Strategy In Python

The importable AIQ EDS file based on Anthony Garner’s article in May 2019 Stocks & Commodities “Backtesting A Mean-Reversion Strategy In Python,” can be obtained on request via email to info@TradersEdgeSystems.com. The code is also shown below.

I backtested the author’s mean-reversion system (MeanRev.eds) using both the EDS module, which tests every trade on a one-share basis, and also via the Portfolio Manager, which performs a trading simulation.

The short side strategy showed a loss overall in the EDS test so I tested only the long side in the Portfolio Manager. I selected trades using the z-score, taking the lowest values.

For capitalization, I used max of three trades per day with a max total of 10 open trades at one time, 10% allocated to each position. I did not deduct slippage but did deduct commissions. I used a recent list of the NASDAQ 100 stocks to run the test. The equity curve and account statistics report are shown in Figure 7.

Sample Chart

FIGURE 7: AIQ. This shows the equity curve (blue line) from long-only trading the NASDAQ 100 list of stocks from 1999 to March 15, 2019. The red line is the NDX index.

!Backtesting a Mean-Reversion Strategy In Python !Author: Anthony Garner, TASC May 2019 !Coded by: Richard Denning 3/14/19 !www.TradersEdgeSystems.com 

!ABBREVIATIONS:
C is [close].

!INPUTS:
meanLen is 10.
longZmult is -1.
shortZmult is 1.
meanMult is 10.

!FORMULAS:

SMA is simpleavg(C,meanLen).
LMA is simpleavg(C,meanLen*meanMult).
STD is sqrt(variance(C,meanLen)).
zScore is (C - SMA) / STD.

!TRADING SIGNALS & EXITS:

buyLong if zScore < longZmult and SMA > LMA.
sellShort if zScore > shortZmult and SMA < LMA.
exitLong if valresult(zScore,1) < -0.5 and zScore > 0.5.
exitShort if valresult(zScore,1) > 0.5 and zScore < -0.5.

showValues if 1.

—Richard Denning
info@TradersEdgeSystems.com
for AIQ Systems

What the Hal?

Some industries are cyclical in nature.  And there is not a darned thing you – or they – can do about it.  Within those industries there are individual companies that are “leaders”, i.e., well run companies that tend to out earn other companies in that given industry and whose stock tends to outperform other companies in that industry.

Unfortunately for them, even they cannot avoid the cyclical nature of the business they are in.  Take Halliburton (ticker HAL) for example.  Halliburton is one of the world’s largest providers of products and services to the energy industry.  And they do a good job of it. Which is nice.  It does not however, release them from the binds of being a leader in a cyclical industry.

A Turning Point at Hand?

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A quick glance at Figure 1 clearly illustrates the boom/bust nature of the performance of HAL stock.Figure 1 – Halliburton (HAL) (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

Which raises an interesting question: is there a way to time any of these massive swings?  Well here is where things get a little murky.  If you are talking about “picking timing tops and bottoms with uncanny accuracy”, well, while there are plenty of ads out there claiming to be able to do just that, in reality that is not really “a thing”.  Still, there may be a way to highlight a point in time where:

*Things are really over done to the downside, and

*For a person who is not going to get crazy and “bet the ranch”, and who understands how a stop-loss order works and is willing to use one…

..there is at least one interesting possibility.

It’s involves a little-known indicator that is based on a more well-known another indicator that was developed by legendary trader Larry Williams roughly 15 or more years ago.  William’s indicator is referred to as “VixFix” and attempts to replicate a VIX-like indicator for any market.  The formula is pretty simple, as follows  (the code is from AIQ Expert Design Studio):

*hivalclose is hival([close],22).

*vixfix is (((hivalclose-[low])/hivalclose)*100)+50.

In English, it is the highest close in the last 22-periods minus the current period low, which is then divided by the highest close in the last 22-periods. The result then gets multiplied by 100 and 50 is added.

Figure 2 displays a monthly chart of HAL with William’s VixFix in the lower clip.  In a nutshell, when price declines VixFix rises and vice versa.

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Figure 2 – HAL Monthly with William’s VixFix (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

Now let’s go one more step as follows by creating an exponentially smoothed version as follows (the code is from AIQ Expert Design Studio):

*hivalclose is hival([close],22).

*vixfix is (((hivalclose-[low])/hivalclose)*100)+50. <<<Vixfix from above

*vixfixaverage is Expavg(vixfix,3).  <<<3-period exponential MA of Vixfix

*Vixfixaverageave is Expavg(vixfixaverage,7). <<<7-period exp. MA

I refer to this as Vixfixaverageave (Note to myself: get a better name) because it essentially takes an average of an average.  In English (OK, sort of), first Vixfix is calculated, then a 3-period exponential average of Vixfix is calculated (vixfixaverage) and then a 7-period exponential average of vixfixaverage is calculated to arrive at Vixfixaverageave (got that?)

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Anyway, this indicator appears on the monthly chart for HAL that appears in Figure 3.Figure 3 – HAL with Vixaverageave (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

So here is the idea:

*When Vixfixaverageave for HAL exceeds 96 it is time to start looking for a buying opportunity.

OK, that last sentence is not nearly as satisfying as one that reads “the instant the indicator reaches 96 it is an automatic buy signal and you can’t lose”.  But it is more accurate.  Previous instances of a 96+ reading for Vixfixaverageave for HAL appear in Figure 4.

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Figure 4 – HAL with previous “buy zone” readings from Vixfixaverageave (Courtesy  AIQ TradingExpert)

Note that in previous instances, the actual bottom in price action occurred somewhere between the time the indicator first broke above 96 and the time the indicator topped out.  So, to reiterate, Vixfixaverageave is NOT a “precision timing tool”, per se.  But it may be useful in highlighting extremes.

This is potentially relevant because with one week left in May, the monthly Vixfixaverageave value is presently above 96.  This is NOT a “call to action”.  If price rallies in the next week Vixfixaverageave may still drop back below 96 by month-end.  Likewise, even if it is above 96 at the end of May – as discussed above and as highlighted in Figure 4, when the actual bottom might occur is impossible to know.

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Let me be clear: this article is NOT purporting to say that now is the time to buy HAL.  Figure 5 displays the largest gain, the largest drawdown and the 12-month gain or loss following months when Vixfixaverageave for HAL first topped 96.  As you can see there is alot of variation and volatility.  

Figure 5 – Previous 1st reading above 96 for HAL Vixfixaverageave

So HAL may be months and/or many % points away from an actual bottom.  But the main point is that the current action of Vixfixaverageave suggests that now is the time to start paying attention.

Jay Kaeppel

Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.

An Obscure but Potentially Useful Oversold Indicator

Trend-following is essentially a “tried and true’ approach to investing.  But overbought/oversold (i.e., attempting to buy low/sell high) – that’s where the “excitement” is.  Of course, when it comes to trading and investing, “excitement” can be highly overrated.  Nevertheless, in this piece I want to talk about a relatively obscure indicator that may be useful in identifying vastly oversold situations.

EDITORS NOTE: The AIQ EDS file for Jay Kaeppel’s indicator is available to download at

The VixRSI14 Indicator

Part of the reason this indicator is obscure is because I think I “invented” it – but only by mashing together an indicator from Larry Williams and an indicator from Welles Wilder.  The first part is the standard Welles Wilder 14-day Relative Strength Index, more commonly referred to as “RSI”.

The 2nd part of VixRSI14 is an indicator created by famed trader Larry Williams which he dubbed “VixFix”.  This indicator is an effort to create a “Vix Index-like” indicator for any security.

AIQ TradingExpert code for these indicators appears at the end of the article.

A Few Notes

*For the record, VixRSI14 is calculated by taking a 3-day exponential average of VixFix and dividing that by a 3-day exponential average of RSI14 (are we having fun yet?).  Please see code at the end of the article.

*I prefer to use VixRSI14 using weekly data rather than daily data

*(Unfortunately) There are no “magic numbers” that indicate that a completely risk-free, you can’t lose, just buy now and watch the money roll in” buying opportunity is at hand (Disclaimer: If there was, I would probably just keep it to myself and not bother writing the article – sorry, it’s just my nature).  That being said, a decent “rule of thumb” is to look for a reading above 3.5 followed by a downside reversal.

(Click any chart below to enlarge)

With those thoughts in mind, Figure 1 displays a weekly chart of Wynn Resorts (WYNN) with the two indicators plotted separately below the bar chart.1

Figure 1 – WYNN with William’s VixFix and Wilder’s RSI 14-day (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

Note that as price declines, VixFix tends to rise and RSI14 tends to fall.  VIXRSI14 essentially identifies “extremes” in the difference between these two.  Figure 2 displays WYNN with VixRSI14 plotted below the bar chart.

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Figure 2 – WYNN with VixRSI14 (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

More “examples” appear in Figures 3 through 8 below.

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Figure 3 – AMD (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

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Figure 4 – BAC (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

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Figure 5 – DISH (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

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Figure 6 – GRMN (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

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Figure 7 – NTAP (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

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Figure 8 – YHOO (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

Summary

As always, I merely present “ideas” here at JOTM.  So, do not assume from the charts above that you have found the “keys to the kingdom”.  But if used in conjunction with other confirming indicators – and remembering to employ some sort of risk control for those instances when a stock price decline fails to arrest itself even after VixRSI4 peaks above 3.5 – VixRSI14 may hold some value.

Indicator Code

EDITORS NOTE: The AIQ EDS file for Jay Kaeppel’s indicator is available to download at

Below is the code for VixFix, RSI14 and VixRSI14 from AIQ Expert Design Studio.

!#######################################

!VixFix indicator code

hivalclose is hival([close],22).

vixfix is (((hivalclose-[low])/hivalclose)*100)+50.

!#######################################

!#######################################

!RSI14 code

Define days14 27.

U14 is [close]-val([close],1).

D14 is val([close],1)-[close].

AvgU14 is ExpAvg(iff(U14&gt;0,U14,0),days14).

AvgD14 is ExpAvg(iff(D14&gt;=0,D14,0),days14).

RSI14 is 100-(100/(1+(AvgU14/AvgD14))).

!#######################################

!#######################################

!VixRSI14 code

VixRSI14 is expavg(vixfix,3)/expavg(RSI14,3).

!#######################################

Jay Kaeppel

Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.

Watch This Indicator

So, the big question on every investor’s mind is “What Comes Next?”  Since this is not an advisory service (and given the fact that I am not too good at predicting the future anyway) I have avoided commenting on “the state of the markets” lately.  That being said, I do have a few “thoughts”:

*The major averages (as of this exact moment) are still mostly above their longer-term moving averages (200-day, 10-month, 40-week, and so on and so forth).  So, on a trend-following basis the trend is still “up”.

0Figure 1 – The Major Index (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

*We are in the most favorable 15 months of the 48-month election cycle (though off to a pretty awful start obviously) which beings Oct.1 of the mid-term year and ends Dec. 31st of the pre-election year.

*Investors should be prepared for some volatility as bottoms following sharp drops usually take at least a little while to form and typically are choppy affairs.  One day the market is up big and everyone breathes a sigh of relief and then the next day the market tanks.  And so on and so forth.

An Indicator to Watch

At the outset let me state that there are no “magical” indicators.  Still, there are some that typically are pretty useful.  One that I follow I refer to as Nasdaq HiLoMA.  It works as follows:

A = Nasdaq daily new highs

B = Nasdaq daily new lows

C = (A / (A+B)) * 100

D = 10-day moving average of C

C can range from 0% to 100%.  D is simply a 10-day average of C.

Nasdaq HiLoMA = D

Interpretation: When Nasdaq HiLoMA drops below 20 the market is “oversold”.

Note that the sentence above says “the market is oversold” and NOT “BUY NOW AGGRESSIVELY WITH EVERY PENNY YOU HAVE.”  This is an important distinction because – like most indicators – while this one may often give useful signals, it will occasionally give a completely false signal (i.e., the market will continue to decline significantly).

A couple of “finer points”:

*Look for the indicator to bottom out before considering it to be “bullish”.

*A rise back above 20 is often a sign that the decline is over (but, importantly, not always).  Sometimes there may be another retest of recent lows and sometimes a bear market just re-exerts itself)

*If the 200-day moving average for the Dow or S&amp;P 500 is currently trending lower be careful about using these signals.  Signals are typically more useful if the 200-day moving average for these indexes is rising or at least drifting sideways rather than clearly trending lower (ala 2008).

Figures 2 through 8 displays the S&amp;P 500 Index with the Nasdaq HiLoMA indicator.  Click to enlarge any chart.

1Figure 2 – SPX with Jay’s Nasdaq HiLoMA ending 2006 (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

2Figure 3 – SPX with Jay’s Nasdaq HiLoMA ending 2008 (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

3Figure 4 – SPX with Jay’s Nasdaq HiLoMA ending 2010 (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

4Figure 5 – SPX with Jay’s Nasdaq HiLoMA ending 2012 (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

5Figure 6 – SPX with Jay’s Nasdaq HiLoMA ending 2014 (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

6Figure 7 – SPX with Jay’s Nasdaq HiLoMA ending 2016 (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

7Figure 8 – SPX with Jay’s Nasdaq HiLoMA ending 2018 (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

Summary

The stock market is in a favorable seasonal period and is oversold.  As long as the former remains true, react accordingly (with proper risk controls in place of course).

Jay Kaeppel

Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.

A Technical Method For Rating Stocks

The AIQ code based on Markos Katsanos’ article in this issue, “A Technical Method For Rating Stocks,” is shown below.
Synopsis from Stocks & Commodities June 2018
I’s it possible to create a stock rating system using multiple indicators or other technical criteria? If so, how does it compare with analyst ratings? Investors around the world move billions of dollars every day on advice from Wall Street research analysts. Most retail investors do not have the time or can’t be bothered to read the full stock report and rely solely on the bottom line: the stock rating. They believe these ratings are reliable and base their investment decisions at least partly on the analyst buy/sell rating. But how reliable are those buy/sell ratings? In this article I will present a technical stock rating system based on five technical criteria and indicators, backtest it, and compare its performance to analyst ratings.
!A TECHNICAL METHOD FOR RATING STOCKS
!Author: Markos Katsanos, TASC June 2018
!Coded by: Richard Denning, 4/18/18
!www.TradersEdgeSystems.com

!INPUTS:
  MAP is 63. 
  STIFFMAX is 7. 
  VFIPeriod is 130. 
  MASPY is 100. 
  MADL is 100.
  SCORECRIT is 5.
  W1 is 1.
  W2 is 1.
  W3 is 1.
  W4 is 1.
  W5 is 2.
 
!VFI FORMULA: 
  COEF is 0.2.
  VCOEF is 2.5.
  Avg is ([high]+[low]+[close])/3.
  inter is ln( Avg ) - ln( Valresult( Avg, 1 ) ). 
  vinter is sqrt(variance(inter, 30 )).
  cutoff is Coef * Vinter * [Close].
  vave is Valresult(simpleavg([volume], VFIPeriod ), 1 ).
  vmax is Vave * Vcoef.
  vc is Min( [volume], VMax ).
  mf is Avg - Valresult( Avg, 1 ).
  vcp is iff(MF > Cutoff,VC,iff(MF < -Cutoff,-VC,0)).
  vfitemp is Sum(VCP , VFIPeriod ) / Vave.
  vfi is expavg(VFItemp, 3 ).

!STIFFNESS 
  ma100 is Avg. 
  CLMA if [close] < MA100.
  STIFFNESS is countof(CLMA,MAP).

!CONDITIONS:
 ! MONEY FLOW:
   COND1 is iff(VFI>0,1,0). 
 !SIMPLEAVG:
    SMA is simpleavg([close],MADL).                              
    COND2 is iff([close]>SMA,1,0).  
 !SIMPLEAVG DIRECTION:                       
    COND3 is iff(SMA>valresult(SMA,4),1,0).  
!STIFFNESS:                          
    COND4 is iff(STIFFNESS<= STIFFMAX,1,0).  
!MARKET DIRECTION:
    SPY is TickerUDF("SPY",[close]).
    COND5 is iff(EXPAVG(SPY,MASPY)>= 
 valresult(EXPAVG(SPY,MASPY),2),1,0).            

SCORE is  W1*COND1+W2*COND2+W3*COND3+
   W4*COND4+W5*COND5.

 buy if Score>=SCORECRIT and hasdatafor(300)>=268. 
Figure 11 shows the summary results of a backtest using NASDAQ 100 stocks during a generally bullish period from April 2009 to April 2018. Figure 12 shows the backtest using the same list of NASDAQ 100 stocks during a period that had two bear markets (April 1999 to April 2009). The average results are similar except that there are fewer trades during the period that contained the two bear markets. Both backtests use a fixed 21-bar exit.
Sample Chart

FIGURE 11: AIQ, BULL MARKET. Here are the summary results of a backtest using NASDAQ 100 stocks during a generally bullish period from April 2009 to April 2018.
Sample Chart

FIGURE 12: AIQ, BEAR MARKET. Here are the summary results of a backtest using NASDAQ 100 stocks during a period from April 1999 to April 2009 that contained two bear markets.
—Richard Denning info@TradersEdgeSystems.com for AIQ Systems

Weekly & Daily Percentage Price Oscillator

The AIQ code based on Vitali Apirine’s article in Stocks & Commodities issue, “Weekly & Daily Percentage Price Oscillator,”  Modifying a traditional indicator can make you look at a chart differently. You can compare indexes, look at price movements during extended periods of time, and make trading decisions based on your observations is provided here:

!WEEKLY & DAILY PPO
!Author: Vitali Apirine, TASC Feb 2018
!Coded by: Richard Denning 12/17/17
!www.TradersEdgeSystems.com

!INPUTS:
S is 12.
L is 26.

EMA1 is expavg([Close],S).
EMA2 is expavg([Close],L).
EMA3 is expavg([Close],S*5).
EMA4 is expavg([Close],L*5).
DM is (EMA1 - EMA2)/EMA4*100.
WM is (EMA3 - EMA4)/EMA4*100.
WD_PPO is WM + DM.
Figure below shows the daily and weekly PPO indicator on a chart of the Nasdaq 100 index (NDX) from 2015 to 2017.

 

Sample Chart

 Here, the daily & weekly PPO is displayed on a chart of the NDX.

 

 

—Richard Denning info@TradersEdgeSystems.com for AIQ Systems

	

Prepare to Bounce

2018 sure was a great year for the stock market.  For almost a month anyway.  Since then, not so much.  And on the heels of last week’s selloff a lot of pundits and prognosticators are suggesting more loudly that the Great Bull Run is dead. And maybe they are right.  But maybe not.

It is almost always a mistake to hang your hat on one indicator to guide your actions going forward.  But at the same time, sometimes one indicator generates a signal so clear it perhaps should grab your attention.  Let’s look at one that is on the verge of sending an important signal.

The VixRSIRatio Indicator

This is an indicator that I developed a number of years ago by basically – I am going to use some highly technical terms here to describe the process I followed so please try to stay with me – mashing together several other indicators from other people.  If you are interested in the actual calculations they appear at the end of the article.  For now, just know that I refer to it as VixRSIRatio.  As I follow it, it gives meaningful signals very infrequently.  But that is OK as the signals it does give often prove to be useful.

For our purposes we will apply it to ticker SPY – an ETF that tracks the S&amp;P 500 Index. The rule is simple:

*A “Bullish Alert” occurs when VixRSIRatio drops to -210 or below and then turns up.

That’s it. Now please note the use of the phrase “Bullish Alert” and the lack of the words “You”, “Can’t” and “Lose”, as well as the lack of the phrase “by putting all of your money in the market at the exact moment a signal occurs.”

This is key.  Also note that there is nothing “magic” about the value -210. Nothing scientific about it. It just seems like a useful cutoff.  Now let’s look at the “Bullish Alert” signals in recent years.  They appear in Figures 1 through 4.

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Figure 1 – Jay’s VixRSIRatio; 2014-2018 (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

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Figure 2 – Jay’s VixRSIRatio; 2010-2013(Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

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Figure 3 – Jay’s VixRSIRatio; 2006-2009 (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

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Figure 4 – Jay’s VixRSIRatio; 2001-2005 (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

As you can see in Figures 1 through 4:

a) Readings below -210 tend to be followed by – at the least – decent trading opportunities.

b) Often these readings presage significant market advances

c) And alas, sometimes the signals come too soon and/or are not followed by much of an advance.

The Here and Now

As of 3/23/18 the VixRSIRatio for ticker SPY stood -354.  So clearly “Buy Alert” is at hand.  So the obvious question is “What comes next”?  Will it be a, b, or c above?

As always, time will tell.

Calculations

In a nutshell, VixRSIRatio combines Larry Williams’ Vixfix indicator with Welles Wilder’s 3-day and 14-day RSI indicators to create two more indicators – VixRSI3 and VixRSI14.  We then divide VixRSI3 by VixRSI14 and invert the whole thing (so that we get an indicator that gives negative readings when the market goes down).

Now you see why I put this at the end….

Below is the code for AIQ Expert Design Studio

############## Larry Williams Vixfix #################

xx is 15.

hivalclose is hival([close],22).

vixfix is (((hivalclose-[low])/hivalclose)*100)+50.

############ Welles Wilder RSI 3-day ##############

Define days3 5.

U3 is [close]-val([close],1).

D3 is val([close],1)-[close].

AvgU3 is ExpAvg(iff(U3&gt;0,U3,0),days3).

AvgD3 is ExpAvg(iff(D3&gt;=0,D3,0),days3).

RSI3 is 100-(100/(1+(AvgU3/AvgD3))).

############ Welles Wilder RSI 14-day ##############

Define days14 27.

U14 is [close]-val([close],1).

D14 is val([close],1)-[close].

AvgU14 is ExpAvg(iff(U14&gt;0,U14,0),days14).

AvgD14 is ExpAvg(iff(D14&gt;=0,D14,0),days14).

RSI14 is 100-(100/(1+(AvgU14/AvgD14))).

############Jay’s VixRSIRatio ##############

VixRSI3 is expavg(vixfix,3)/expavg(RSI3,3).

VixRSI14 is expavg(vixfix,3)/expavg(RSI14,3).

VixRSIRatio is -((((VixRSI3/VixRSI14)-1)*100)-50).

Jay Kaeppel

Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.

Biotech + Gold (Updated)

In this article I wrote about an index I follow that combines the biotech sector with the gold stock sector. I also wrote about “one way” to trade that index.  This article builds on that piece and adds a new “rule” to create more trading opportunities.
The BIOGOLD Index
Figure 1 displays the index that I created using AIQ TradingExpert.  It combines ticker FBIOX (Fidelity Select Biotech) with ticker FSAGX (Fidelity Select Gold).
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Figure 1 – Jay’s BIOGOLD Index (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
Also included in the lower clip is an indicator referred to as RSI32, which is the 2-day average of the standard 3-day RSI.
The Old System
In the original article I tested an approach that works as follows using monthly data:
*When the RSI32 drops to 32 or below, buy BOTH FBIOX and FSAGX
*After a buy signal, sell both funds when RSI32 rises to 64 or higher
For results, please see the original article.
The New System
The “new rules” are as follows:
A “buy signal” occurs when either:
*The RSI32 drops to 32 or below
*The RSI32 drops below 50 (but not as low as 32) and then reverses to the upside for one month
After either of the buy signals above occurs, buy BOTH FBIOX and FSAGX
*After a buy signal, sell both funds when RSI32 rises to 64 or higher
Figure 2 displays the BIOGOLD Index with various buy and sell signals marked.
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Figure 2 – Jay’s BIOGOLD Index with RSI32 signals (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
To test results we will:
*Assume that after a buy signal both FBIOX and FSAGX are bought in equal amounts
*We will assume that both funds are held until RSI32 reaches 64 or higher (i.e., there is no stop-loss provision in this test)
For testing purposes we will not assume any interest earned while out of the market, in order to highlight only the performance during active buy signals. Figure 3 displays the hypothetical growth of $1,000 (using monthly total return data) using the “system”.
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Figure 3 – Hypothetical Growth of $1,000 using Jay’s BIOGOLD System (1986-present)
Summary
For the record, I am not “recommending” that anyone go out and initiate trading biotech and gold based on what I have written here.  Before trading using any approach it is essential for a trader to do their own homework and carefully consider all of the pro’s and con’s associated with any specific approach.  For example, while the trade-by-trade results for the above look reasonably good, it should be noted that there have been 4 separate drawdown’s in excess of -19% along the way, including a maximum drawdown of -37% in 2008.  In considering any approach to trading it is essential to first think long and hard about how well one would “weather the storms”, BEFORE focusing on potential profitability.
To put it more succinctly is the simple phrase “Don’t cross the river if you can’t swim the tide.”
Jay Kaeppel
Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.

The VixRSI14 Indicator – Part 2

In this article I detailed an indicator I refer to as VixRSI14 using monthly charts. Today let’s apply the same method to weekly bar charts.  Before we do that a quick look at how this indicator functions.
VixRSI combines two indicators – Larry William’s VixFix and Welles Wilder’s Relative Strength Index (RSI).  In Figure 1 you see a weekly bar chart for YHOO.  Notice that as price declines the VixFix indicator rises and RSI falls. VixRSI14 essentially measures the difference between the two and looks for extremes as a sign of a potential reversal. See Figure 5 for YHOO with VixRSI14.
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Figure 1 – YHOO with Williams VixFix (with 3-day exponential smoothing) and Wilder’s 14-period RSI (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
The Weekly Version of VixRSI14
We will use the same method I described in the previous article, i.e.:
*We will calculate the VixRSI14 indicator (see code at end of article) on a weekly basis
*A “buy alert” occurs when VixRSI14 drops below 3.00 after first rising to 3.50 or higher
Once again, please note that:
*There is nothing magic about 3.50 or 3.00
*Not every “buy alert” is followed by an immediate rally (or even any rally at all for that matter)
*Any actually trading”results” will depend heavily on what you trade, how much of it you trade, when you actually get in, when you get out with a profit and/or when you get out with a loss.
*This VixRSI14 alert signal is simply serving notice that a given security may be overdone on the downside and may be ready soon to reverse to the upside.  Nothing more, nothing less.1
Figure 2 – AAPL(Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
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Figure 3 – AXP (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
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Figure 4 – IP (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
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Figure 5 – YHOO (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)
Summary
In 2018 I intend to try to share a few more trading “ideas” that maybe are not quite “finished products”.  VixRSI14 fits neatly into the “Idea” category. Sometimes the alerts are early.  Sometimes the alerts are late.  Sometime the alerts don’t really pan out at all.  Sometimes alerts are followed by one more sharp decline which is then followed by a major rally. So maybe some sort of trend reversal confirmation would be helpful.  I don’t know.
Hey, that gives me an idea….
Code:
William’s VixFix is simply the 22-period high price minus today’s low price divided by the 22-day period price (I then multiply by 100 and then add 50).  That may sound complicated but it is not.
The code for AIQ TradingExpert appears below.
########## VixFix Code #############
hivalclose is hival([close],22).
vixfix is (((hivalclose-[low])/hivalclose)*100)+50.
###############################
####### 14-period RSI Code ###########
Define periods14 27.
U14 is [close]-val([close],1).
D14 is val([close],1)-[close].
AvgU14 is ExpAvg(iff(U14>0,U14,0),periods14).
AvgD14 is ExpAvg(iff(D14>=0,D14,0),periods14).
RSI14 is 100-(100/(1+(AvgU14/AvgD14))).
###############################
VixRSI14 is then calculated by dividing the 3-period exponential average of VixFix by the 3-period exponential average of RSI14
####### VixRSI14 Code ###########
VixRSI14 is expavg(vixfix,3)/expavg(RSI14,3).
###############################
Jay Kaeppel
Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.

The VixRSI14 Indicator – Part 1

While the bulk of the financial world focuses most of its attention on whether or not Bitcoin will turn to sh, er, something that rhymes with Bitcoin, a lot of “old timers” continue on with trying to look at markets in a more traditional way. Unfortunately, some people who try to look at markets in a more traditional way also spend an inordinate amount of time “dividing one number by another” thinking there is some purpose to it (“Hi. My name is Jay”)

The only good news is that every once in awhile something useful – or at least potentially useful (since no single calculation guarantees profitability which also involves other “minor” issues such as which securities to trade, allocation size, entry method, profit taking criteria, stop loss triggers and so on and so forth). A number of years ago I stumbled upon a calculation that I ultimately refer to as VixRSI (for reasons that will become fairly obvious soon).  More specifically I have a few different versions but one I like is call used VixRSI14.

First the Good News: In this and some future articles I will detail how I apply VixRSI14 to monthly, weekly and daily price charts.

Now the Bad News: Nothing that I will write in any of those articles will detail a “simple automated system that generates you can’t lose trading signals guaranteed to make you rich beyond the dreams of avarice.”  Sorry about that. But I thought you should know.

The truth is that the indicator generates signals – and yes, a certain percentage of the time those signals aren’t that great.  And even on occasions when the signals are decent all of the factors I mentioned above (securities traded, capital allocation, etc.) still hold the key to turning a “signal” into a “profit”.

VixRSI14

VixRSI14 is calculated by combining Larry William’s “VixFix” indicator with the standard old 14-day RSI from Welles Wilder. I’ve decided to put the calculations at the end of the article in order to avoid scaring anyone off.

For now let’s look at what to look for on a monthly price chart.

VixRSI14 on a Monthly Chart

OK, true confession time: there is (at least as far as I can tell) no “one best way” to use VixRSI14 on a monthly chart.  So I will simply show you “One way.”

*A “buy alert” is triggered when the monthly value for VixRSI14 first rises to 3.5 or higher and then drops back to 3.0 or below

*Before going on please note that there is nothing “magic” about 3.5 or 3.  Different values can be used and will generate varying results.

*Also, some may prefer to simply look for a drop from above 3 to below 3 without requiring a move above 3.5

*Finally please note the use of the phrase “buy alert” and the lack of the phrase “BUY AS MUCH AS YOU CAN RIGHT THIS VERY MINUTE!!!!”

Figures 1 through 4 show several different Dow30 stocks “through the years.

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Figure 1 – Ticker AXP (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

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Figure 2 – Ticker BA (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

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Figure 3 – Ticker HPQ (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

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Figure 4 – Ticker IBM (Courtesy AIQ TradingExpert)

Summary

Buy alerts on monthly charts using the criteria I described are obviously very rare.  In fact many securities never see the VixRSI14 rise high enough to trigger an alert.  Likewise, not every 3.5 then 3 event for every stock will work out as well as those depicted in Figures 1 through 4.

Still, remember that I am just presenting an “idea” and not a finished product.

Code:

William’s VixFix is simply the 22-day high price minus today’s low price divided by the 22-day high price (I then multiply by 100 and then add 50).  That may sound complicated but it is not.

The code for AIQ TradingExpert appears below.

########## VixFix Code #############

hivalclose is hival([close],22).

vixfix is (((hivalclose-[low])/hivalclose)*100)+50.

###############################

####### 14-period RSI Code ###########

Define periods14 27.

U14 is [close]-val([close],1).

D14 is val([close],1)-[close].

AvgU14 is ExpAvg(iff(U14&gt;0,U14,0),periods14).

AvgD14 is ExpAvg(iff(D14&gt;=0,D14,0),periods14).

RSI14 is 100-(100/(1+(AvgU14/AvgD14))).

###############################

VixRSI14 is then calculated by dividing the 3-period exponential average of VixFix by the 3-period exponential average of RSI14

####### VixRSI14 Code ###########

VixRSI14 is expavg(vixfix,3)/expavg(RSI14,3).

###############################

Jay Kaeppel

Disclaimer:  The data presented herein were obtained from various third-party sources.  While I believe the data to be reliable, no representation is made as to, and no responsibility, warranty or liability is accepted for the accuracy or completeness of such information.  The information, opinions and ideas expressed herein are for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute and should not be construed as investment advice, an advertisement or offering of investment advisory services, or an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy any security.